Fishermen Cross an Imperceptible Line Into Enemy Waters     Indian and Pakistani fishermen are caught in a decades-old dispute over maritime borders, leading many to be incarcerated for straying across.  The New York Times
   
  
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    Afghanistan: Memories of Glass      
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
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 On the memorialization of  decades of war in Afghanistan.  The Revealer.
   Extremists Make Inroads in Pakistan's Diverse South      
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
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 On the rise of militancy in the Sindh province and how sectarian groups are targeting religious minorities.  The New York Times
   In Karachi, a unique celebration of the World Cup    The Baloch people of Karachi love football more than cricket, and every World Cup is celebrated in a wonderfully vibrant way.  Scroll.in
   Malala Yousafzai's diary inspires other Pashtun girls yearning for education         
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
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 The words of a young girl whose determination to go to school made her a target for the Taliban has made others eager to learn.  The Guardian.
   Meet Nazo Dharejo: The toughest woman in Sindh      
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
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 Longform profile of landlord Nazo Dharejo, who spent years battling family feuds and dacoits to save her father's farmland.  The Express Tribune Magazine .
   
  
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    Above Class and Clerics: The Saga of Heer Ranjha    Examining the legacy of Heer and Sahibaan, the stars of the subcontinent's epic romances, and their relevance to Pakistani society today.  The Revealer.  
   A rare Christian retaliation    Residents of a Christian neighborhood in Gujranwala did something unprecedented when their settlement was attacked by Muslims: They fought back.  The Christian Science Monitor.
   A Marked Life    Pakistan's Ahmadiyya Muslim community has been persecuted for decades. The hate campaign has reached Sindh, where wealthy and middle-class Ahmadis alike are being targeted.  The Revealer.
   Tea in the boiling city    A look at Karachi's enduring love for tea and its history in the subcontinent.  Roads and Kingdoms .
   Flood survivors extend hospitality    In 2010, as floods ravaged southern Punjab, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Sindh, those displaced in southern Punjab still found space for their families - and their herds of cattle and pets.  The Express Tribune
   Jamaatud Dawa includes religious lessons with flood relief    During the floods in Sindh in 2011, Hafiz Saeed's banned philanthropic group offered religious lessons with aid to survivors.  The Express Tribune.
   Pakistan's Fauji Foundation headhunts for Bahrain's security units    As protests spread through Bahrain in the spring of 2011, Pakistan's Fauji Foundation was hiring guards for placements in Bahrain. The first exclusive  news story  and its  followup  for The Express Tribune.
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